Unlike 99% of chocolate that is made in wealthy nations, MIA makes chocolate in Africa – the world’s poorest continent – to provide sustainable jobs, transfer skills and create four times more revenue than the export of raw cocoa.

In 2019, MIA production addressed eight United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, supported 15 full-time jobs and protected over 5,000 trees in Madagascar.

The MIA ‘1 for Change’ impact programme committed to ‘MIA Green’ to offset CO2 with a tree planting programme and created a ‘Fruit Tree Scholarship’ fund to facilitate secondary school education for vulnerable students.

MIA works with a variety of suppliers in Africa to make products locally. The purpose is to unite a network of the best supply partners around the production of delicious products and to support their businesses in the process.

 

 

The chocolate making team is at the heart of the Made-In-Africa business model that creates value-added products to improve livelihoods. Beyond the production team, each batch of MIA made in Madagascar also benefits the communities that provide the ingredients, materials and services to transform fine flavour cocoa into delicious chocolate.

 

 

Below is a summary of the the social benefit enjoyed by the communities that form a network of 14 local supply partners.

 

 

The fourth largest island in the world, Madagascar’s flora and fauna evolved in isolation for millions of years. As a result, the island nation is home to 15% of the world’s species and 80% of all plants and animals found in Madagascar are endemic. Creating sustainable livelihoods that protect the environment while providing local communities with jobs is crucial to save the unique species that live in Madagascar.

Cocoa trees are beneficial for the environment as they form forests and require a shade canopy from a second layer of hardwood trees. These forests form ecosystems for indigenous plants and animals.

 

 

The Sambirano Valley is in Northwest Madagascar, just outside the cocoa capital Ambanja. The Sambirano River extends from the mountainous Upper Valley that lemurs call home to the coastal Lower Valley with rich mangroves forests.

 

 

The Upper Valley is also home to the Tsaratanana Nature Reserve, a park under the highest protected status due to its unique flora and fauna.

Protecting the environment with sustainable livelihoods is crucial to safeguarding the region’s rich natural resources and providing local communities with alternatives to slash-and-burn agriculture. 

 

 

In addition to the benefits of value-added chocolate production, MIA dedicates 1% of sales to the ‘1 for Change’ social development programme that can either help protect a local endangered species, create a healthier environment or improve a community’s livelihoods.

 

 

Projects completed in our first two years of trading include a school kitchen for better nutrition, fruit tree scholarships to support secondary education and a reforestation programme to offset CO2, provide environmental education and protect lemurs. The school kitchen benefits 272 students, 50 fruit trees scholarships were awarded and 60 trees were planted to offset CO2.

 

 

MIA is the work of many. In addition to extending our appreciation to our supply partners in Africa, we want to thank the rest of you who make the MIA vision possible.

Customers are creating positive change in Africa with their purchases of MIA at retailers around the world, and it’s thanks to the shared passion of investors, suppliers, distributors and everyone in between that we have the opportunity to bring MIA to market and tell the Made-In-Africa story.

###

You can download the full PDF 2019 Impact Report here: https://we.tl/t-ToEtMy30YV

 

MIA has committed £500 of its 1 for Change impact fund to help communities in Madagascar combat the devastation of COVID-19 with hand washing stations, local production of face masks and free meals for vulnerable families.

According to a recent BBC report, Africa has thus far avoided the devastation that COVID-19 has reaped on other parts of the world but the continent faces the risk of serious economic impact. For their part, fair trade CEOs have already called on the G20 Group to support cocoa farmers in developing countries from the worst effects of the COVID-19 crisis.

MIA, a challenger brand with a range of chocolates made bean-to-bar in Madagascar to create more value for local communities, wants to help fight the coronavirus at this relatively early stage when interventions can have the biggest impact. The brand is responding to urgent warnings like the one issued by the British Ambassador to Madagascar, Phil Boyle, who warned in early April that, “The island has minimal health infrastructure, with 10 doctors for every 100,000 people…. If developed countries don’t step up, the humanitarian consequences could be considerable.”

MIA Co-founder Sarah Lescrauwaet explains the project to combat COVID-19: “Africa is the poorest continent in the world and most countries do not have even a fraction of the health and social security means that we have in Europe. In Africa, people have to do their shopping at outdoor markets and many live day-to-day, so stocking up on essential food items is impossible. Needless to say, Amazon home deliveries are not an option. Worse yet, many vulnerable families find themselves sacrificing daily meals because they cannot earn their daily wages.     

    

It’s great that Money for Madagascar and its partners in Madagascar are taking initiative. We’re proud to support their work. Women who are unemployed due to COVID-19 now have jobs making masks, and these same masks will protect first line responders. Additionally, handwashing stations will be set up outside markets to reduce the likelihood of infection where human contact is unavoidable for purchase of staple foods.”

Money for Madagascar also supports vulnerable families that now have face a dual challenge; their children no longer receive a complimentary school lunch and parents now only have half a day to earn a living due to partial COVID-19 lockdown in Madagascar.

Sarah: “We know that the COVID-19 problem is bigger than any single effort but we believe that working together we can make a real difference to people in need, and this is exactly why we created the 1 for Change impact fund when we launched MIA. We want to thank all of our customers for making this project possible with their purchases of MIA chocolate!”

MIA chocolate has launched a multi-faceted tree planting programme in Madagascar to offset sea freight carbon emissions, rebuild lemur habitats and provide local populations with forest fruits. The new programme, called MIA Green, will be implemented under the brand’s impact fund, 1 for Change.

MIA Co-founder Sarah Beach explains: “Thanks to millions of years in isolation from mainland Africa, Madagascar is home to numerous endemic plant and animal species. In fact, the island nation is home to 15% of the world’s species with around 80% of flora and fauna in the country existing nowhere else in the world! We couldn’t find a more urgent setting for the MIA Green initiative, a way for the brand to help repair Madagascar’s forests while offsetting carbon emissions.”  

   

The MIA Green tree planting programme will involve reforestation of over sixty different species that recreate the diversity of the national park forest in the Andasibe-Mantadia area that occupies the central-eastern side of the world’s fourth largest island. MIA has partnered with UK charity Money for Madagascar to implement the programme.

Money for Madagascar Director Irenée Rajaona-Horne: “Madagascar’s forests are a gift to the planet but natural resource pressures result in an annual loss of about 400,000 Ha, or nearly 1% of the nation’s forests! Through partnerships with MIA and other contributors, we aim to plant 200,000 trees across 2,000 Ha to join up isolated pockets of forest that will renew sources of food for endemic lemurs and give them more mobility.

The tree planting programme is also connected to forest-friendly sustainable livelihood activities because we recognise that people must be at the centre of long-term environmental solutions. We have education programmes for school children and the local population is incentivised to protect the forests which can also be a food source thanks to the inclusion of fruit trees in the programme.”

Part of a growing number of companies that puts people and planet on par with profit, MIA has made a commitment to support its MIA Green initiative indefinitely.

Co-founder Brett Beach reflects: “Our brand commitment is to make amazing flavours that do good, and our 1 for Change impact fund gives us the opportunity to make a positive impact beyond our supply chain. People in Madagascar depend on forests for survival and we know that the environment is important to conscious consumers, so we’re really pleased we can launch MIA Green with Money for Madagascar.”

The initial contribution from MIA will fund sixty trees and the brand will continue to support the effort annually as part of its 1 for Change programme which is funded by 1% of company sales.

###

Related info: BBC documentary on Earth’s Tropical Islands. The first episode is dedicated to Madagascar with a call to protect lemurs from extinction: https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episodes/m000cs07/earths-tropical-islands

For more information on Money for Madagascar, visit www.moneyformadagascar.org

The MIA Story

Set up by a group of foodies with a shared passion for the African continent, its people, wildlife and natural ingredients, MIA, short for Made In Africa, is different for its ability to deliver delicious tasting and beautiful products that are entirely crafted in Africa.

The entire bean-to-bar chocolate making process – including the roasting, shelling, grinding, tempering and even packaging – takes place under one roof in Madagascar to utilise the freshest and best ingredients. By doing this, MIA also brings three more benefit to local communities in Africa (vs. export of cocoa).

The MIA brand is partnered with Proudly Made in Africa (PMIA) to ensure that products aren’t just made on the African continent but are ethically produced with as many locally sourced ingredients and materials as possible. The MIA supply chain is audited according to the Ethical Trading Initiative Base Code.

MIA is committed to a 1 for Change programme which ensures that 1% of all MIA sales are dedicated to development projects in places where a little goes a long way. Whether it’s projects to help save local endangered species or to improve a community’s livelihoods, the program is central to the brand’s philosophy.